Monroe County School District Home Page
Monroe County School District Home Page
« May 2017 »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

 

Print
Head Start
Announcements
Child Abuse Prevention Month 2017



April was first declared Child Abuse Prevention Month by presidential proclamation in 1983. Since then, April has been a time to acknowledge the importance of families and communities working together to prevent child abuse. The majority of child abuse cases stemmed from situations and conditions that can be preventable when community programs and systems are engaged and supportive. A community that cares about early childhood development, parental support, and maternal mental health, for instance, is more likely to foster nurturing families and healthy children.

Below is the email address to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services where you can find information and resources.

https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/preventionmonth

ENROLLMENT 2017-2018
Head Start Program Open Enrollment

For the 2017-18 school year, Head Start is
still accepting applications.


Applications are available on-line at:
www.Keysschools.com (under school tab, go to Centers and then click on Head Start)
Or applications may be picked up from a Head Start Site Coordinator at:

  • Horace O’Bryant School
  • Gerald Adams Elementary School
  • Stanley Switlik Elementary School
  • Key Largo School
There is NO COST to Parents
Families must meet the eligibility criteria for the program
Transportation is available, ask a Site Coordinator for more details

Head Start programs promote ‘school readiness’ by enhancing the social and cognitive development of children through the provision of educational, health, nutritional, social and other services to enrolled children and families. They engage parents in their children's learning.
Give your child a HEAD START!

CALL TODAY!
(Se habla español)
In
Key Largo School, call Isabel Campanioni (305) 453-1255 x 57354
In Marathon
Stanley Switlik Elementary, call Isabel Vargas (305) 289-2490 x 59309
In Key West
Horace O’Bryant School, call Elizabeth Alvarez (305) 296-5628 x 65392
Or Jon Doughtry x 65393
Gerald Adams, call Latrice Pla (305) 293-1609 x 51329

*Head Start is a federal grant program under Monroe County School District that serves children from low-income families and children with disabilities.


National Nutrition Month

“Put Your Best Fork Forward" is the theme for NNM 2017 which serves as a reminder that
each one of us holds the tool to make healthier food choices. Making small changes during National Nutrition Month® and over time, helps improve health now and into the future. As nutrition experts, Academy members can help guide the public on gradually shifting toward healthier eating styles by promoting NNM activities and messages during March.


Be sure to visit some of the links below for resources.

http://www.nourishinteractive.com/nutrition-education-printables/category/84-healthy-national-nutrition-month-kids-activity-fun-activities
http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/national-nutrition-month
http://www.eatrightpro.org/resources/media/multimedia-news-center/national-nutrition-month-media-materials
National Eye Care Month
January is National Eye Care Month:
Taking care of your eyes can be a priority just like eating healthy and physical activity. Healthy vision can help keep you safe each day. Having your children’s eyes checked regularly is important. Although older adults tend to have more vision problems, preschoolers may not see as well as they can. Eye exams at the optometrist are important even once your child starts school and has visual screenings.
  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends vision screening for all children aged 3 to 5 years to find conditions such as amblyopia, or lazy eye, which can be treated effectively if caught early.
  • Visual screenings test for visual acuity (clarity and sharpness), but healthy eyes are about more than just 20-20 vision.
  • Other areas of vision such as color vision or focus and tracking might present problems that aren’t tested for in visual screenings.
    Ways you can help protect your vision
  1. Get regular comprehensive eye exams.
  2. Know your family's eye health history. It's important to know if anyone has been diagnosed with an eye disease or condition, since some are hereditary.
  3. Eat right to protect your sight: In particular, eat plenty of dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale, or collard greens, and fish that is high in omega-3 fatty acids such as salmon, albacore tuna, trout, and halibut.
  4. Maintain a healthy weight.
  5. Wear protective eyewear when playing sports or doing activities around the home.
  6. Wear sunglasses that block 99 percent-100 percent of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation.
Resources: CDC; Website: https://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/healthyvisionmonth/

Disclaimer | Site Map | Privacy Policy | View "printer-friendly" page | Login   
Site powered by SchoolFusion.com © 2017 - Educational website content management